Sherlock: It’s “The Final Problem”

Rebloggy

Rebloggy

Don’t Get Murdered While You’re Wearing an Alarming Shade of Pink. SH

Normally I wouldn’t do what I just did above, but because I love this show so much, and obviously, a great many of you probably do as well, I just wanted to take a moment to recognize another blogger who frequently comments on Sherlock, and who also has this magnificent gift for insight. She truly offers a unique perspective on a variety of shows and movies.

First of all, though, many of you are probably aware that tonight’s two hour episode of “Sherlock” may not only be the season final, but perhaps the series final as well—I myself hope that’s a total lie. Sure, the series may have run its course, but when it was good it was very good, and if this is the end I think we all hope that it offers a satisfying conclusion.

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Pinterest

Back in 2010 “Sherlock” made superstars out of its leads Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, both of whom are practically everywhere now, and largely the reason for such speculation.

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Rebloggy.comwriting crisp and clever, jammed with so much material, it was amazing writer’s, Mark Gattis (who also plays Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s older brother) and Steven Moffat were even able to cram in so much minutiae.

Each episode features marvelous deduction sequences which often move so fast, it requires repeat viewings to catch all the crucial and important details.

Naturally, now that Cumberbatch and Freeman’s schedules are so demanding, it feels like the two years in-between each series is probably needed… just so fans can catch up!

Not every episode has been pure genius—sometimes the writing for the show is cluttered, like my attic—but it continues to consistently offer plenty of neat twist and turns to keep the show refreshing and entertaining.

Again, much like my attic writing, except that the writers of Sherlock actually offer stories which lead to rational conclusions… unlike my attic.

However, I continue to work on solving that problem and any day now I could have a breakthrough in that area—just like Hollywood could select a Star Wars film for Best Picture. In other words… don’t hold your breath.

But back to the blogger whose talent I wish to recognize.

Her name is Andrea, and her blog is named “Crime and Relative Dimension in Space” and here’s the link to it  https://crimeandrelativedimensioninspace.com/2017/01/14/a-few-subjective-truths-about-sherlock-series-4/

Andrea, offers some of the best in-depth writing on shows and movies I’ve ever read.

Like the writing on Sherlock, it is truly OUTSTANDING material to review. Not only does her writing uncover a wonderful range of emotions in the characters, but her writing also offers some great observations on what is going on under the surface of those characters.

All this she presents beautifully well while touching on each of the characters true motivations, sense of humor, devotion of friendship, and of course… the cool sound deductive reasoning that permeates each episode.

There’s heart and soul here folks, and it’s sounds like she was actually in the minds of Mark Gattis and Steven Moffat when they were writing the material for the show. She’s that good!

Although, Sherlock may be coming to an unbearable end tonight (hopefully a special movie now an then would be nice), I’m hoping Andrea’s comprehensive writing will not, as it offers so much more to take in, be it Sherlock, or some other show.

She also offers insights into novels, soundtracks, games and movies, each with plenty of thoughtful commentary, offering a wealth of information to critically digest on those subjects.

So again, please check out her blog…

A Few (Subjective) Truths about Sherlock, Series 4

I really think you’ll enjoy it.

 

 

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26 comments on “Sherlock: It’s “The Final Problem”

    • Your welcome, Andrea. I always felt readers out there would enjoy going deeper into some of these programs—especially when it comes to Sherlock. Sherlock has always been something of a roller coaster ride that could take your breath away, just by our trying to keep up with the rapid deductions and leaps he makes. However, I wanted to expose more readers to your sight, so that they could explore your enjoyable insights as well. I felt this was the best way I could do that, and I think what you have to offer will help them in their enjoyment of, not only Sherlock, but some of the other programs you analyze. :O)

    • Your welcome, Kate. Andrea’s blog has been helpful in my be able to understand what just happened. I don’t always get a firm grasp of what happens in each episode of Sherlock, it moves so fast. Not that everyone else is like me, as I sometimes see myself like Pooh Bear—a little slow of brain—but Sherlock is so rapid, I find it easy to get lost. Andrea’s blog really helps, not hust with Sherlock, but some other wonderful programs, and movies, too. Plus her post are very entertaining to read.

  1. You’re the second blogger I follow who is talking about Sherlock. I’ve never watched an episode, yet I know I’d like it. Over the winter I’ll work on rectifying this TV watching oversight. Now off to visit your recommendation. Thanks.

    • That’s exactly how I feel about it, Suze. The writing is so good, that even when its not at its best, it still has the power to involve us. I’d miss that. So like you, I hop this is not the end, especially since all those involved in the show have expressed a desire to find a way to make it continue to happen. We’ll just have to wait and see if they can.

    • Thank you, Johanna. Aren’t murder and mayhem fun—particularly in the hands of Sherlock! Anyway, Andrea’s blog is a treat after watching one of those episodes, because there is so much going on. It’s not just the leaps in deduction that get discussed, but the insights into the very human interactions, they’re truly delightful. There’s just not enough love in this world, and this show aims very high when it comes to that emotion. ‘O)

    • Jan, you’ll find that one of Andrea’s post on a show can read like cliff notes on an episode—and a lot more entertaining. Not only does she offer wonderful insights to Sherlock, but also some other shows, and movies, too. Sometimes, even a video analysis. :O)

    • I can honestly say that you won’t be disappointed in much of what you see. although nothing is perfect, its still quite clever. However, anything you might miss due to the expedient nature of each episode is very succinctly explained in Andreas blog. You’d be surprised how much slips by us. ‘O)

  2. Great idea to send readers in Andrea’s direction Paul. My wife was just commenting about being interested in watching the show in the future. We have watched Elementary from the start, seen all the Sherlock Holmes-related theatrical movies, etc. Just missed seeing this version so far. Sounds like it would be well worth our time..as is Andrea’s site. She has posted her thoughts on other shows we have seen so I’ll be spending time there going forward. (I knew something was up with Sherlock’s finale because the local multi-plex had it playing on one of its screens for those who wanted to consume it that way!)

    • I love her blog and it will actually prove beneficial as a review for each episode, as it does a fine job of exposing clues we may have missed due to the quick pace at which the stories race along. Each series consist of three 90 minute episodes (that play just like a movie) and given the excellent performances—Benedict Cumberbatche’s performance is so astute, and the speed at which he describes each deduction will blow you away, even upon reveal) make re-watching not only a must, but entertaining as well. Of course, genius has its flaws, but for all the shows failings at times, there is more than the usual wit, excellent acting, and brilliance to more than compensate for those failings. So not everything works, but what does (and there is much to relish) works extremely well. The first episode of series one is outstanding for the deductions, and the first episode of series two is stupendous. The finale of series two will leave you dumbfounded, while series three went for humor, heart, and the great bond that is formed between the characters. I found that I enjoyed episode two of series four the best of this recent (possibly last series) series—because you do get blind sided, even more so than in episode one of series four—and this last series is extremely dark and psychological in nature. Andrea’s blog will fill in all the blanks on this, and other shows, too. A wonderful writer, too. Also I just found out that the BBC was hacked and on Saturday night the Russian audience (one of the biggest for the show) was able to see “The Final Problem” before anyone else! Possibly a second hacking in their favor—but who can say, right? Thanks for the comment, Bruce. 😀

  3. She most definitely is something. You’re quite lovely yourself. Thank you for highlighting this. Now, I can speculate endlessly.

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